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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
. and now the question is, with running science in order to expand science which is what i have done, then okay, now the normal credentialing process to take it seriously. [inaudible] >> to bring everything back down a little bit to the pragmatic, i don't have a science background but i am a political science -- and i was struck with the wave in the comparison of it with the stock market which is hanging around in the back of my head, and i haven't read it yet but the idea of lots of discrete entities doing things, creating something larger with or without people, with or without that intention of creating something larger. is this already being done, to apply this to policy say you know okay we want to do this. we are doing it this way but it's not working or all of these actions we are taking are somehow creating this other thing that we haven't even thought about. i feel like there could he and education, sort of guide to how we would put recruitment strategies or how to use them as a tool in other fields? >> i think you're absolutely right in that is why had done this thing up di
. >>> japanese robots that look after the elderly, it sounds like science fiction but it's increasingly science fact and with good reason. japanese society is aging faster than any in the world. nursing facilities are stretched past capacity. against this backdrop, researchers are building new and humane intelligent machines. >> reporter: a new game is being played at this hold people's home south of tokyo. ♪ >> reporter: the residents move their bodies on cue from a robot. the exercise helps the brain and fights aging. people from the nursing industry interested in the robot came along to watch. >> translator: coming here today and seeing people talking and dancing with them made me realize that robots have become something very commonplace to old people, too. >> reporter: many of the nursing care robots are japanese inventions. they're catching the eye of facilities overseas. in some countries, they recognize the medical equipment. ironically, care giving robots have been slow to catch on in japan. people still expect the functions of caring to be given only by humans. but the situation may
master it." "it is almost a science, and yet if is a puzzle without an answer. it requires complete concentration and total relaxation. it satisfies the soul, fortifies the intellect. it is at the same time, rewarding and frustrating." mr. palmer, we had your golf partner's statute shipped in here, too. i think he just dropped the potter. -- putter. [laughter] i thought -- i am not a great golfer, but as a psychologist, i understand the psychology of the sport in that sense. and i thought, since there's probably one our two call first -- golfers here, i can probably pass on to you what i think is the greatest golf device ever, and it is a story about mr. palmer and the manager of the detroit tigers. i was having dinner with jim, who is also known to have a colorful word or two when he speaks, and he told me about a round of golf he was playing with arnold palmer. he was chipping everywhere but the affair with. -- but the fairway. i am sure that he had a word or two. after a few holes or so, mr. palmer said to him "jim, which you like a little advice?" think about that. if any of us
science professor who left the year before i arrived to work on a phd in east ucla. his parents had been on the faculty at aup and though he had made a very distinguished career for himself in the united states as a scholar in the middle east, gila home to leave the school during the difficult time when beirut had fractured civil war and the israeli incursion of 1982. the city was a mess. the school is under assault. he believed that going back and running the school and providing leadership at a time of crisis was the best thing to do for an institution that is loved and he gave his life to the school was assassinated in january of 9094. >> by who and how? >> most likely by the fanatical wing of hezbollah, a group known as islamist jihads the comprised lebanese shia who had historically been underprivileged, excluded from the politics and economics of the country, had ideological affinity for the regime in iran, from 1979 and have been radical in the israeli purge to lebanon in the 1980s. there is a very toxic mix that let them should make steps the climax of the assassination of malcol
, science changes. nothing is more worthless than a science textbook from the '50s. >> the word shouldn't change from the original constitution, surely. >> my words aren't based on the constitution. >> i get that, but what it is is about fairness and equality. i went to see "lincoln" the movie a few weeks ago. it was a riveting movie. daniel day-lewis was great as lincoln. it was all about how he fought in his last few months as president to get slavery abolished. there were millions of americans who thought slavery was acceptable who were outraged ought what he was doing. he knew instinctively it was just wrong, unfair, unequal. >> and why did he know that? because it's in the bible. >> but we -- >> it's in the bible. he was building it on biblical truth. the bible says that every man should be free. >> right, but you don't think every man should be free and equal. >> no -- of course we're free. and of course we're equal. >> what does that mean? >> you can love anybody you want to. >> but you don't think a gay man or woman should be free to be married like a straight man or woman? what
expectancy. it was, and still is, an assumption that as science and the rationality -- as the disenchantment of the world's, pre-modern forces will lose their history. the two most important of these are religion. events refute the liberal expectancy. religion still drives history. religion is also central to the emergence of america's public philosophy. at the risk of offending specialists by distortion through compression, what we offer a very brief placement of americans foundries. machiavelli begins modern political philosophy. this spot is a convenient demarcation. the agents -- ancients saw to enlarge the likelihood of the emergence of noble leaders. machiavelli, however, took his bearings from people as they are. he defined the political project as making the best of this flawed material. he knew that nothing would ever be made from the crooked timber of humanity. machiavelli was no democrat. he reoriented politics towards accommodations, strong and predictable forces rising from a great constant, human nature common to all people in all stations. for 44 years, machiavelli and luther
things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> our second story "outfront." is chuck hagel's nomination dead on arrival? now hagel, the former republican senator and vietnam war hero, could be president obama's choice to be the next defense secretary. but today he's under attack by a group of gay republicans known as the log cabin republicans. now, this full-page ad said hagel's wrong for the job because of a statement he made back in 1998, when he questioned whether, in his words, a quote, openly, aggressively gay nominee could be an effective u.s. ambassador. now, a lot's changed since then, and hagel has since apologized, though that has also come under attack for his somewhat controversial beliefs on israel, iraq, and iran. are these attacks justified, or is he just the latest political target in an ugly game of gotcha politics. "outfront" tonight, our all-star panel. ryan, let me start with you. let's look at chuck hagel's credentials. a vietnam war veteran, two purple hearts,
quickly. >> the process of threat assessment is, is more of an art than a science. oftentimes you're dealing, uh, with potential enemies whose thinking is obscure or whose inner thoughts are unavailable to you and you have to read the tea leaves in trying to divine what their actions might be. >> people want to make a choice, they want to say let's focus on the current problem, less on the future. so other people say let's focus on the future and not so much on the current problem and unfortunately we don't have that option, that's just not with the role the united states plays today. >> ultimately defending the country with less money will mean rethinking what defense really is. >> the old-fashioned establishment of national security still thinks that the world is all about nation-state conflicts. so climate change doesn't rank high, energy scarcity doesn't rank high, resource generally, global health issues. even financial management after 2008 still ranks far below the sort of old-fashioned, you know, country-versus-country conflict issues. that's changing, but it's changing sl
't it their deficit in large part deficit? >> of course, but they have political amnesia. ideology is the science of idiots. here's one of these moments where when you live inside the box and refuse to look at empirical evidence, refuse to understand history to show us how economies work, how tax cuts or increases affect populations, then they are going to follow this line of idiocy over their own, i think, political cliff. and the partisanship is going to wreak tremendous havoc on the republican party in the upcoming elections. >> we have limited time. i want to go back to john harwood. is there a time here, john, when we're going to see the markets start to react or are we expecting most traders to wait until after the first to make big decisions? >> i think that's when they reacted. if we go over the cliff, even for a couple of days, you're going to see a reaction. i think at the end of the day you will see action if we go over the cliff for a couple of days, because i don't agree with jonathan that they are immune to public opinion. it is going to take a while for it to kick in. a lot of the
the most aboard climate science is going on. these are the most destructive fires in colorado history and they come after the warmest weather ever recorded. you could do the same exercise all over the planet. this is what it looks like as the planet begins -- and i underline begins -- to warm pita mohamed mursi had been declared the winner in each presidential race. >> we will respect agreements and international law as well as egyptian commitments and treaties with the rest of the world. >> to talk about the significance of election, we are joined by sharif of del produce. >> the first democratically elected in egypt's history. his win marks a victory over the lingering remnants of mubarak's regime. >> chief justice john roberts prove to be the surprise deciding vote. joining with the court's liberal members. >> the highest court in the land has not spoken. we will continue to implement this law and we will work together to improve on where we can. >> me state the positive first. this really is a huge victory for our side. in spite of all of my concerns with this law, it did not go f
rocket science to figure out why that kind of story is so endearing to poor people. i mean, that's... that's... that's dinner and a show. >> narrator: behind the simple rustic imagery was the message of the coming kingdom of god, an enigma jesus did not attempt to simplify. >> jesus tells a parable about somebody who takes a mustard seed, plants it in the ground, and it grows up to be a great tree, or a bush at least-- a weed, though, in plain language. now, imagine an audience reacting to that. presumably the kingdom is like this, and they have to figure out, "what's it like? you mean, the kingdom is big? but you just said it's a big weed. so why don't you say a big cedar of lebanon? why a big weed? and besides, this mustard... we're not certain we like this mustard. it's very dangerous in our fields. we try to... we try to control it. we try to contain it. why do you mean the kingdom is something that the people try to control and contain?" every... every reaction in the audience... the audience fighting with themselves, as it were, answering back to jesus, is doing exactly wha
universities and allow more education in science and mathematics in the school system which would allow more people to do research in this field. to allow more electric energy instead of so much depending on petroleum and oil. guest: about the education system. the second question is about the role of private enterprise in these technologies. education is the silver bullet and the thing that we can do most cheaply and easily to get kids excited about solving big problems. it needs to begin not in universities but at elementary and high school level education. every year we choose 35 young innovators who we believe have the greatest capacity to change the world. this year most of the 35 lived and worked in the united states, less than five had gone to elementary school in the united states. they came from china, europe, israel. we are not doing a good job in the states in making science and technology a profitable activity, where kids can commit their entire lives and careers to it. the best thing we can do is to invest in science and technology and mathematics education in our elementary and
him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's lots of things. all waking up. connecting to the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. we're going to wake the world up. and watch, with eyes wide, as it gets to work. cisco. tomorrow starts here. >>> breaking news tonight. retired general norman schwartzkof has died. it reads, "barbara and i mourn the loss of a true american president, and one of the great military leaders of his generation. a distinguished member of that long, great line hailing from west point, general norm schwarz kof epitomizes our nation. more than that, he was a good and decent man and a dear friend. barbara and i send our condolences to his wife, brenda, and his wonderful family." very sad news for the country. >>> we start our second half of our show with the other stories we're watching tonight. former president george w.h. bush remains in intensive care at
had high school science teachers who can't negotiate a bunson burner for goodness sake. i wouldn't suggest that we necessarily give everybody a gun, it's not for everybody. but how we deal with it in utah is going to be way different than how we deal with it in chicago. >> david, one thing that came out of your interview they've thought was interesting that the nra i didn't think would ever be on, he was calling for forcing states to participate more. if you're the obama administration and you're looking for the nra's help on something, well, forcing states to participate more on the background checks, all of these things that aren't happening, if the nra is going to do that and force these conservative republicans governors to sign legislation that did that, that would be a step. >> andrea, i want to talk about the second term cabinet. chuck hagel did not get a ringing endorsement from senator schumer or -- >> what senator schumer said was really very revealing. if a democratic senator is not going to come to chuck hagel's defense, i think there is serious problems there. >> he
news chief science and health correspondent robert bazell is live from new york there in front of the presbyterian hospital. bob, what do we know about secretary clinton's condition and how she is being treated right now? >> richard, we know precious little. we had the one statement yesterday evening from secretary clinton's staff that said she suffered a concussion that was related -- excuse me -- suffered a blood clot related to this concussion. usually when somebody has a blood clot related to a concussion it is in the brain and would not be treated with anticlotting drugs. she is being treated with anticlotting drugs. so maybe she has a blood clot someplace else. we don't know anything -- there have been no statements today either from the hospital here or from the state department or for her personal staff about what her condition is. so, unfortunately, we don't have a lot to report and there is some mystery to this. a lot of doctors tell me that this story doesn't add up. there could be something else wrong with her. we're not saying we know that. the lack of information
to understand there is no established science right now to determine whether or not a gene will predispose someone to violent behavior. i mean that's the first thing. this is a very complicated situation. people have genes. they don't always predispose or actually turn into a specific problem. and in this case if someone were to be found to have a gene, and this is a needle in a haystack, it might give some clues as to whether or not someone might or, other people might be predisposed to this kind of crime. heather: this would be a first of a kind study or a first of a kind research to >> again, there have been studies that have been done on violent offenders, and previously and we have gotten some body of evidence that helped us to determine whether this is a problem. where it is more established, where we're doing genetic testing where it is incredibly value in determining predisposing conditions such as taysak's disease or whether someone ends up with sickle cell anemia. whether someone is predisposed to alzheimer's or cancer it gets controversial and this particular probably the most c
and financing, if you look at the statistics are round or they measure the performance in mathematics, science, and reading, you can see where the problem is. today, they were in the number 27, 28, and so on. productivity generally is the x factor that accommodates for 60% of why one country grows and another does not. generally, it includes things like political dynamic, so we know what is happening there. that is not my prediction. look at this framework, capital, labor, productivity. you will see why i am incredibly bullish. in terms of capital, these economies by a large did not have the debt burden that other countries are facing right now. why is that important? these countries are not suffering from a deal leveraging problem. 60%-70% is under the age of 25. in you got there, over 50% is under the age of 15. we can talk about that once i sit down. once again, a really interesting story. they were talking about 30% increases over goods and services. in virtually all statistics, things like political improvements and freedoms, this is really essential. countries like rwanda have been ranke
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)